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Pits and Grills

Tim's picture

Pits and Grills (post #191691)

How many of you have built in place brick smoking pits or wood/gas fired grills? Or a good smoker?

I like slow smoked (over a wood fire) BBQ and I also like both charcoal and gas grilling (this is not intended to be a discussion of the differences, but if you don't know the difference we can cover that, too).

I have a small "water" smoker (the 16" cylinder you operate with charcoal and wood chuncks in the bottom, a pan of water in the middle and cooking gills aboove that) that does ok for a few slabs of ribs, a picnic or boston butt or various foul, but not really good enough for a brisket and certainly not up for a pig or a cabrito. I also have the small (14") Old Smoky (that's a charcoal grill from Houston, for those that don't know) and a cheap gas grill. So I'm looking to upgrade.

Considering some of the fine well made smokers out there like Yoder or Klose. Also kicking around the idea of brick pit or even making my own smoker (I have a welder and can use it reasonably well). Nothing huge, but I'd like to be able smoke a couple of good sized packer cut briskets or a half dozen chickens from time to time.

What do you have? What do love about it? What do you hate about it? How do you use it? What would you change if you could?

Used to see the brick units (post #191691, reply #1 of 5)

Used to see the brick units all the time when I was a kid.  They'd be used for 2-3 years, until the novelty wore off, and then they'd sit there in the yard slowly crumbling for another 20 years or so until someone got disgusted with them and removed them.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

But, you live in (post #191691, reply #2 of 5)

a state that has, what 6-7 months of winter a year? I would expect permanent outdoor cookers to be a little more prevalent in the more temperate regions (God's Country), but have seen much there either.

Kentucky born and raised.  (post #191691, reply #3 of 5)

Kentucky born and raised.  You don't see them much here (especially not since propane cookers became popular).


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

So would (post #191691, reply #4 of 5)

that be a pork prominent BBQ state or a beef prominent BBQ state?

You a BBQ fan?

I was born and lived the first half of my life in north Texas, very much a beef leaning region. (I've had people in Illinois ask me "What is a brisket?)  The only brick pits I ever recall seeing were very old.

Propane/gas grills have their place. But you can't use them to make real BBQ (A skilled user can pull off a good imitation, though).

Slow smoking meat is a time consuming and inconvenient way to cook. I can see why its not too popular any more. Most people won't even take the time to use charcaol.

Where are all the Texicans around here anymore?

I though there were a few pitmasters around here, too.

I'd say more of a pork state (post #191691, reply #5 of 5)

I'd say more of a pork state back then -- if not the BBQ then the politicians.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville