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*#* RFH Ranch *#*

MikeSmith's picture

Got a call a while ago to come talk about a new house for one of my Mother's friends


she lives in an old Victorian that is all up and down.... owned the buildable lot behind her house.. anyways, we developed  a couple of concepts and settled on a single floor with no steps


from that the Radiant Floor Heat seemed like a no-brainer


in late April we got the Tree Service guys in to take out the huge Norway Maples, that is her old house in the background



when they got done chipping , there were logs lying all over the lot



turns out they send a separate "log truck" just to handle them


this shed was smack in the middle of the new garage



so something had to give



 


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 7/28/2007 8:32 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:34 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:35 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:36 am ET by MikeSmith


Edited 7/28/2007 8:38 am ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #1 of 375)

the shed on the property was pretty nice and i hated the idea of demolishing it...14 x 20 with a 2d floor... had a guy lined up who was going to move it to his backyard


but that finally fell thru


Randy made short work  of the demo



got it all in (3)  20-yard dumpsters



next thing was to get the red cabin moved in... no bushes on this lot



the topography required one step in the footing..


 here they are forming for an 8x16 patio in the back



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 7/28/2007 8:38 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:40 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:41 am ET by MikeSmith


Edited 7/28/2007 8:43 am ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #2 of 375)

formed and poured the house first... then the garage & front entry


here Mike is putting the keyway in the footing with a wooden sled



i picked up the 6x6 WWM for the slab



Randy built us a ramp so Joe would get enough elevation to hit the back wall



here's the front.. the garage & entry will tuck into the setback area



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 7/28/2007 8:47 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:48 am ET by MikeSmith

Edited 7/28/2007 8:49 am ET by MikeSmith


Edited 7/28/2007 8:51 am ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #3 of 375)

How wide's them footings? What's presumed bearing capacity of the dirt?

(post #129532, reply #4 of 375)

from memory.. 2000 lb..we've scratched the loam off  and the footings are going on the subsoil... which is why we had to step  the foundation down in the back... the loam was a little deeper than i expected


the footings are typically 10 x 20 with (2)  #4 bars  the walls are 10"  3000 lb


by code, we can also pour a 12" wall with no footings... but most form companies are set up for 10" walls nowadays


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore


Edited 7/28/2007 10:12 am ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #5 of 375)

A single story here would be a 12" wide x 6" thick footing with a 6" thick stemwall. Pretty much everything is a monopour. Wouldn't your sub rather set up and pour once?

(post #129532, reply #6 of 375)

no way , jose'....


the form companies around here are not set up for monopours....


some of the tracts used to get built that way... but i haven't seen any in years....


 the bottom of our foundations have to be 40" below finish grade


 


you're talking about  walls & slab in one pour  , right ?


which means ... all compacted fill, all utilities, all RFH tubes.. everything in place with only forms to hold them.... yeepers !


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #7 of 375)

Mike, we are 12-18" below grade, much easier than you have it, although on my current project I had to spend ~$12K removing rock to get that deep and to get a utility trench.


By monopour I mean footing and walls. 2x8 is used for footing forms, and it's held in place with steel stakes and spreaders made out of 1x4 PT. Once the footings are formed and staked, lines for the wall forms are snapped on those 1x4 cleats. Then, metal cleats are nailed along those snapped lines, and panels are stacked using snap ties. Rebar is of course added at the appropriate times during all of this.


Bottom line, you get a single pour foundation and for better or worse the 1x4 is left embedded. I was aghast the first time I saw that, but it's de rigeur around here... so be it.


I'll attach a photo... it's probably too big... can't resize it on this machine...

(post #129532, reply #8 of 375)

Are those spreaders as hard to remove as I think they would be?


Do you just drive them out with a sledge?

(post #129532, reply #10 of 375)

You don't remove them. I guess the positive news is that I dug some up last year in the process of putting an addition on a 20-year-old house, and they were still there good as new.

(post #129532, reply #9 of 375)

is that imported stone or native soil ?


which one are you ?



where is this ?


 


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore


Edited 7/28/2007 5:53 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #11 of 375)

Thanks for the resize. I took the pic, I'm not in it. The rock laying right around the footing is what we hammered out. They piled it against the bottom of the forms to avoid too much squeeze-out. When it started to set they scraped it away with a flat shovel and then we scraped even more when we put the footing drains down. The large pile of rock to the right is a load of 2" minus for some sand-set pavers that will eventually go back there. I had it dumped when it was still possible to get a dump truck right there. Once we started forming the access got a lot worse.  All further landscaping at the sides or rear will be by hand or mini-track.

(post #129532, reply #32 of 375)

From the new show, John from Cincinnati.


"I got my eye on you"


Meant as Oh cool another great thread.


Clicking is so much easier then sweating.

(post #129532, reply #33 of 375)

is that anything like W K R P in Cincinnati ? 


i loved that one


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #34 of 375)

Wayyyyyy wackier  It"s on HBO on Sunday nights.


http://www.hbo.com/johnfromcincinnati/

(post #129532, reply #35 of 375)

meanwhile.... back at the ranch...


Brad came over and trenched for the drain lines and potable water



the kitchen sink



the 4x6 PT sill will have a 3/4 PT plywood top so we have a total depth of 6 1/4"....


that will allow us 2" of foam and  a minimum of 4 1/4" of  slab



Roy & I drove up to Smithfield to pick up the the 2" Performguard foam



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 12:25 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:26 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:26 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 12:30 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #36 of 375)

we did the finegrade so the foam would have a good base and did some more compacting with a waterhose.... those are potable water lines running from the  utility room inn the garage  to various locations



this shows the 3/4" PT cap to  raise the sill to 6  1/4"



this shows the 2" foam liner around the perimeter... so we not only have 2" under the slab, we also have  the 3 1/2" of PT & 2" of foam at the edge of the slab



ready for the PEX... .. I already gave Sam a heads-up that we'd be ready for him



 


 


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 12:34 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:35 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:36 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:39 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 12:40 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 12:42 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #38 of 375)

Sam brought the PEX



and started laying his pattern...



 basically  two zones, each supplied by an Electric HW heater..



here's the test manifold Sam designed from various fittings



meanwhile.... we got the Plumbing OK, so it's ready for concrete



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 1:50 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 1:51 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 1:52 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 1:53 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 1:54 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #39 of 375)

here's the floor plan



and the front elevation



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 1:59 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 2:00 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #40 of 375)

Mike, I like your 4x6 "rim joist" detail.  I've seen the 2" foam liner on Lstiburek's site, but with a concrete stem wall.  Will you do anyting to finish the 4x6 on the outside? 


 

(post #129532, reply #41 of 375)

the plywood sheathing will cover it just like it would on a 2x6 sill..... it's part of the tie-down required for wind uplift design

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #42 of 375)

brought in Hathaway to pour the slab...



they've got that neat gas powered jitterbug with an 8' straightedge



Heritage is pouring this job.... that's the Owner of the concrete company driving that truck..... nice guy



Ken & I put his initials in the garage slab... he wants his workshop in this corner



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 7:44 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 7:44 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 7:46 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 7:47 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #43 of 375)

the front entry & the 8' x 16' rear patio  are both going to be stamped concrete......


 I had to build the slab forms so I put a 3.5 x 3.5 nosing all around.. using some 4x4  I salvaged out of the shed.. these are those Simpson bolts i've used on other concrete work... they work some slick



 


i added a cant strip to the forms with my new Grex pin nailer ( SS ).. first chance I had to use my new toy



i also saw cut the new slabs for control joints



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 7:53 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 7:54 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 7:55 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #44 of 375)

this is the first time we've used any stamped concrete, but i knew Hathaway had a lot of experience in it


here's the front entry



and some of the rubber stamp molds being laid in place on the rear patio



with another view of the layout......



and a closer look at the back



and the finished job...... John will come back to seal this tomorrow



 


 


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/5/2007 7:59 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 8:00 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 8:02 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/5/2007 8:02 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/5/2007 8:03 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #45 of 375)

Mike, I didn't notice a VB under your insulation. Did I miss that, or is it not required? Here the minimum would be 6 mil poly. I just used a product called Stego Wrap, which is 15 mil and comes 14'x140'--it's an incredibly heavy roll. Also comes with 4" tape that I used to seal all the pipe penetrations thru the material before laying the 2" foam down.

(post #129532, reply #46 of 375)

dave.. we have almost 4' of gravel... and it was open to the weather for about two months


i felt the poly would just trap water trying to work it's way down  and the 2" EPS would be enough of a vapor retarder to satisfy


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #47 of 375)

Looks good,


How will you protect the stamped concrete during construction?


I like to cover it with an inch of sharp sand, then compactible soil 'till final grading.


We mostly build SOG in this part of Georgia.


 


Chuck S


live, work, build, ...better with wood
live, work, build, ...better with wood

(post #129532, reply #48 of 375)

so far i covered them with 1/2" cdx.....

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #49 of 375)

time to start framing...Roy & Chuck are still working on Change Orders so i'll stand the walls up 


start with some insulated box headers, cutting up the 2" EPS foam with the EZ Guide and my 8 1/4"



i glued the foam in with a can of spray foam, then glued and nailed the headers



 


once i had all the headers assembled......



 i had to figure some way of anchoring the Proctor Wall jacks ... we have a least 3" of concrete over the RFH tubes & potable water.. so i decided on 1" of ply held in place with  1.5" positive placement nails



 


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/9/2007 10:19 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/9/2007 10:19 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/9/2007 10:20 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/9/2007 10:20 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #129532, reply #50 of 375)

i  devised a strap hinge to rotate the wall and hold the shoe  on the sill.. just shoved a piece of metal strapping between the foam and the 4x6



the walls had quite a few places where i had to leave the sheathing off due to plumbing risers



the plywood extends below the shoe to act as a tie to the 6x4 sill



here's the south wall (kitchen ) up & braced



the Airshow was practising  for the weekend.. kept making their turns over the job


 



Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Edited 8/9/2007 10:27 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/9/2007 10:29 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/9/2007 10:29 pm ET by MikeSmith

Edited 8/9/2007 10:31 pm ET by MikeSmith


Edited 8/9/2007 10:31 pm ET by MikeSmith

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com